Posts Tagged sound control

Acoustics First releases video on Vibration Isolation

Vibration IsolationAcoustics First has conjured up yet another video demonstration.  As the fourth in a series designed to help explain common acoustic principles, this video briefly reveals what is necessary to provide vibration isolation.

Vibration isolation can quickly prove to be obtuse and relatively difficult to understand. Common problems like footfall from upstairs neighbors, industrial noise from machinery and HVAC equipment or isolating speakers and scientific devices can require completely different approaches. Most often, an on site assessment should be completed by a qualified engineering professional to determine an appropriate acoustic solution. In many cases the solution will require a modification to the structure and implement more than a single strategy.

This simple vibration demonstration challenges to provide a basic understanding of how acoustical materials may be used to prevent the spread of mechanical noise and vibration through existing structures like walls, floors and ceilings.

In this acoustic demonstration, a surface mounted piezo transducer connected to an analog meter will register levels of sound vibrations transmitted to the table. A vibrating device placed directly on the surface will transmit sound vibrations and resonate loudly throughout the table. These vibrations will register on the analog meter. By inserting isolation materials between the device and the surface, the mechanical sound transmission is reduced and sound no longer registers on the meter.

VIBRATION ISOLATION DEMONSTRATION: Controlling Mechanical Sound Transmission

CLICK HERE FOR MORE ON: VIBRATION CONTROL PRODUCTS

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Acoustics First Sound Diffusion Demonstration Video

Acoustic Diffuser DemonstrationAcoustics First has just released another in a series of videos to help explain acoustical principles using simple, easy to understand video demonstrations. This latest demonstration tackles the mystery of acoustic sound diffusion. Using an array of ping pong balls to represent sound visually, this video simply demonstrates what occurs when sound strikes the surface of an acoustic diffuser. First, you will see what happens when sound hits a flat reflective surface with no acoustical treatment. Acoustic Sound DiffuserThe balls all bounce at the same time and in the same direction. This represents what happens to the sound when it hits a flat reflective surface like a wall.  Then you see what happens when sound hits an acoustic sound diffuser. You will immediately notice the energy of the wave of balls is scattered in all different directions as well as deflected at different time intervals.  Diffusers, disperse or scatter the sound like crowd control, preserving the sound to maintain sound clarity without destructive interference.  This is the basic principle behind acoustic sound diffusion.

Click here to view the demonstration: DIFFUSING / SCATTERING SOUND: Sound Diffusion Explained

DIFFUSING / SCATTERING SOUND: Sound Diffusion Explained from Acoustics First on Vimeo.

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Acoustics First Corporation supplies acoustical panels and soundproofing materials to control sound and eliminate noise in commercial, residential, government, and institutional applications, worldwide. Products include the patented Art Diffusor®, sound absorbers, noise barriers, acoustical fabrics and accessories. Acoustics First® products are sold for O.E.M applications, direct, and through dealers. For more information on acoustical materials and their application, please visit www.AcousticsFirst.com or call Toll Free 1-888-765-2900 (US & Canada).

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Cutting Wedge Acoustical Foam Featured on 2012 Loudspeaker Sourcebook

Cutting Wedge Acoustical Foam makes the CoverAcoustics First’s Cutting Wedge acoustical foam is featured on the cover of the 2012 Loudspeaker Industry Sourcebook.  Acoustical foam can be used in any application that requires sound absorption.  This material is used to prevent destructive specular reflections from distorting or color sound.  It eliminates room modes and standing waves.  Cutting Wedge foam provides more absorption than flat foam by increasing the exposed surface area with its “blade” pattern.

Cutting Wedge Classic Acoustical FoamAvailable in 2″, 3″ and  4″ thick material, this premium acoustical foam can be used to line the cavities of speaker boxes, remove reflections in recording & broadcast studios, quiet machinery and much more.  1’x1′ or 2’x4′ sheets allow the application to be designed however you with to provide optimal coverage for your application.

http://www.acousticsfirst.com/acoustical-foam-cutting-wedge-classic.htm

For more information, feel free to contact Acoustics First,  Toll Free 888-765-2900 | info@acousticsfirst.com | www.AcousticsFirst.com

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Acoustics First Corporation supplies acoustical panels and soundproofing materials to control sound and eliminate noise in commercial, residential, government, and institutional applications worldwide.  Products include the patented Art Diffusor®, sound absorbers, noise barriers, acoustical fabrics and accessories. Acoustics First® products are sold for O.E.M applications, direct, and through dealers.  For more information on acoustical materials and their application, please visit www.AcousticsFirst.com or call Toll Free 1-888-765-2900 (US & Canada).

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Baffled by Acoustical Ceiling Treatments?

Cloudscape Ceiling Baffle (CSBF15P) 4’x2′ x 1.5″

Acoustics First® adds more ways to get ‘Baffled’ and improve large room acoustics.

Acoustics First® has ‘amped up’ the Cloudscape® line of ceiling baffles.  These acoustical baffles reduce reverberation in applications such as gymnasiums, auditoriums, performance venues, theaters and restaurants.  They can be suspended from open truss and pre-engineered suspension systems or alternatively mounted direct to a roof deck or wall.  In addition to the standard 4’x2′ x1.5″ PVC encapsulated ‘echo-nomical’ baffle, Acoustics First® has expanded the selection to include three alternate finishes.  If you wish to upgrade the size of the standard PVC Cloudscape® Ceiling Baffle, we now have a 2″ thick option available in sizes up to 4’x10′, with some limitations.  If you wish to upgrade the finish, you can choose the durable rip-stop nylon sailcloth, product code CSBF2S with 9 color choices.  If sailcloth doesn’t ‘float your boat’, choose the fabric encapsulated Cloudscape® Baffle.   The CSBF2F is encapsulated in a sewn Guilford of Maine® FR701®  fabric and will coordinate with the Sonora® ridgid acoustical wall panels.  The acoustical ceiling baffles are extended even further with an offering of exterior grade fabric for outdoor applications.  Overall, you now have 4 choices of baffle configurations, more sizes and 96 finish options.  Additionally, all the 2″ thick options use environmentally friendly Ecose® glass fiber.  For more information or to receive a quotation, please contact Acoustics First® via email, info@acousticsfirst.com, or call Toll Free 1-888-765-2900 (US & Canada).

Cloudscape Ceiling Baffle (CSBF2S) Sailcloth Finish

Cloudscape Ceiling Baffle (CSBF2S) Sailcloth

Cloudscape Ceiling Baffle (CSBF2F) Fabric

Cloudscape Ceiling Baffle (CSBF2F) Fabric

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Video: How Acoustical Panels Improve Sound

http://www.acousticsfirst.com/acoustic-demonstration-video-how-acoustical-panels-improve-sound.htm

Acoustical Panel DemonstrationThe awareness of acoustics has dramatically increased over the past ten years. With this awareness, the access to the information on the Internet has also amplified. How does one begin to decipher all of the publications that are now available in magazines and on the World Wide Web? During your research, you may have heard of comb filtering, standing waves and room modes. What do these terms mean and why should I need to know them to understand acoustics? Without using a lot of math or complicated acoustical terms, Acoustics First has produced a video to demonstrate how acoustical panels improve sound within a room. This five-minute demonstration will help you understand that acoustical materials change the physical dynamic of the room to affect sound, in a way that cannot be achieved with electronics.

This video is available under the “Resources” section of our website or at www.acousticsfirst.com/video.

How Acoustical Panels Improve Sound (Phase Demonstration) from Acoustics First on Vimeo.

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