Posts Tagged acoustical panels

Silent Pictures® goes BIG for Ditch Witch®

This BIG group of Silent Pictures® is made up of 3’x3′ panels for a total size of over 9 feet by 15 feet!

When Ditch Witch® needed to acoustically treat their training room, they had a big and bold idea – take a cool promo photo and use that to make a Silent Pictures® mosaic! The required scale made it easier to break up the photo into a 3’x3′ matrix, which also eased the shipping and installation process! The final product (at over 9 feet tall and 15 feet wide) is imposing, and while it isn’t quite life-sized, the impact is indeed massive!

“Thank you so much for all the help you and your team did on this project. Our training room is complete now.
We are over the moon happy.”

Ditch Witch Midwest

, , ,

Leave a comment

Sonora® Panels help Citizen Heights Church

Citizen Heights Church found a great facility to move into, even during a global pandemic. However, a major obstacle was that the facility had a traditional cathedral ceiling and a nearly 6 second reverb time was not compatible with their high-energy modern services. To address this issue, they included custom Sonora® panels in their overhaul. This decision helped take their 6 second reverb time down to an incredible 1.5 seconds – creating a space that maintains a level of intelligibility which would have been impossible otherwise.

Read the full story here.

Original Technologies for Worship article link.

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

Demystifying Acoustic Data: Part 2 – Test Material Mounting

For anyone new to the world of acoustics, there is a multitude of terms, coefficients and numbers that are thrown around.  This flood of information can seem intimidating, especially to beginners. In this series, acoustician Cameron Girard of Acoustics First® hopes to help you distinguish between what’s useful and what’s not.

Part 2: How Mounting in Testing Affects Sound Absorption Data

As I discussed in my previous article, the best way to compare the performance of sound absorbing panels is by referencing the Sound Absorption Coefficient (SAC) and Noise Reduction Coefficient (NRC). However, these coefficients are often used as marketing tools. Be on the lookout for companies that list absorption coefficients and NRCs without mention of a particular testing standard or mounting method. It’s vital to check for this information, as direct comparisons to competitors and other materials can only be made if their testing procedures are the same.

The sound absorption of a material that covers a flat surface not only depends on the physical qualities of the material but also on how the material is mounted during installation. The mountings specified in laboratory tests are intended to simulate conditions that exist in normal use, such as direct wall mounting and installation into a ceiling grid.

Many materials for treatment of walls or ceiling are tested using what is called Type ”A” mounting. Type ”A” mounting means the test specimen was placed directly on the test surface of the reverberation chamber. Lay-in ceiling tiles, on the other hand, are often tested using ”E400” mounting. The ”E” designates a sealed air space behind the specimen (simulating  the air gap between a dropped tile ceiling and the structural ceiling) and the number after the ”E” is the depth of the airspace in millimeters. The airspace behind the acoustic material affects the sound absorption by acting as a bass trap. The deeper the cavity behind the panels is, the lower the fundamental of the “trapped” frequencies will be.

To see what this look like in terms of actual numbers, let’s take a look at how different mounting methods effect the sound absorption coefficients of Acoustics First’s HiPer® Panel (a low-profile, composite absorber/diffuser panel).

Since the HiPer® Panel can be used effectively in multiple applications; we had it tested in accordance to the two most-common mounting procedures, Type E-400 and Type A. The results of the laboratory tests are as follows:

Product Info

Sound Absorption Coefficients

Product Name Thickness Mounting 125Hz 250Hz 500Hz 1kHz 2kHz 4kHz

NRC

1″ HiPer® Panel 1″ E-400 0.43 0.28 0.51 0.76 0.99 1.10 0.65
1″ HiPer® Panel 1″ A 0.09 0.28 0.78 0.75 0.94 0.85 0.70

 

As you can see from the chart, the sound absorption coefficient at 125 Hz varies greatly between E-400 mounting (SAC of .43) and Type-A mounting (SAC of .09). If mounting the HiPer® Panel in a ceiling grid, with a sizable airspace, you can expect significant low-frequency absorption, but mounting it on a wall (Type-A) will result in much less absorption at 125Hz.

Other mounting methods are available, but are not used as frequently. Here are some of the basic mounting designations (See ASTM E795 for more information.)

Type A mounting – Test specimen laid directly against the test surface (wall panel on drywall).

Type B mounting – Test specimen cemented directly against the test surface. Type B mounting is intended to simulate acoustical ceiling tiles or other sound-absorptive products adhered to a hard surface with an adhesive.

Type C Mounting—Test specimen comprising sound-absorptive material behind a perforated, expanded, open facing or other porous material.

Type D Mounting—Test specimen mounted on wood furring strips.

Type E Mounting—Test specimen mounted with an air space behind it (dropped tile ceiling).

As we’ve discussed, acoustical data can vary greatly depending on the mounting method used during testing. Acoustics First tries to include as much information about testing procedures as possible, because we feel an informed client makes the best client.

Contact Acoustics First for your all your sound control needs!

, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Custom Panels and the Aesthetics of Acoustics

There is a saying in our industry: When it comes to designing a space, acoustic consultants are blind and architects are deaf. In reality, it is in both parties best interest to consider the other side when designing a space, so visual form meets acoustic functionality.

Let’s be real, standard acoustic treatment is far from sexy. Typical 2’x4’ panels, while fully functional, don’t present the architects with much in terms of visual interest. This is where Acoustics First can supplement the design goals of the architect/interior designer with our technical expertise to find a custom solution that sounds and looks great.

Hexagonal ToneTiles™ at Kramer Middle School.

Hexagonal ToneTiles™ at Kramer Middle School.

Recently, Acoustics First® was asked to provide the custom panels for the cafeteria at Kramer Middle School in Washington DC. It was settled that hexagonal ToneTiles™ would be suspended as clouds in a geometric pattern around the ceiling. The resulting “honeycomb” effect is not only visually appealing, but the treatments effectively cut down the overall reverberation; increasing speech intelligibility and making the space more comfortable for a variety of activities.

Acoustics First® enjoys the inherent challenge in making these custom panels a success. We have plenty of experience in fulfilling the design goals of architects and interior designers. Interested in seeing more of these custom projects?

Visit http://acousticsfirst.com/installations-education-school-museum.htm to see some more examples.
Feel free to give Acoustics First® a call to discuss your custom treatment needs!

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

Season’s Greetings from Acoustics First – 2014

Season’s Greetings from Acoustics First!

DIY Gift idea using Tone Tiles

DIY Gift idea using Tone Tiles™ and some Creativity!

Acoustics First would like to offer this Do-It-Yourself gift idea to all of our readers this year.

If you’ve got a creative painting habit, give a customized gift that not only shows your creative talents, but also helps to improve the sound of the room!

Above is a festive holiday painting on one of our 1’x2′ Tone Tiles™.

Want to go a little bigger?  We also have 2’x3′ Tone Tiles™ in Stock.

Amsterdam iPhone photo

2′ x 3′ panel  Photo from iPhone

 

A Second Idea is to get a photo printed on a Tone Tile™.

Got a really great vacation photo or family photo on your phone?  Most phones today have pretty decent cameras, and if you have the right photo, a local printer may be near you that can clean it up and print it onto one of our Tone Tiles™.*

How about “posting” that photo to the “wall” of your living room, and have a great conversation piece as well as improved acoustics – at the same time !

 

 

Season’s Greetings and Happy Gift Giving!

– Acoustics First

* Don’t forget to ask your local printer if they have flatbed printing capabilities.

 

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment