Acoustics First® Art Diffusor® Model D spotted in music video for Usher’s “Rivals” featuring Future…

Acoustics First® Art Diffusor® Model D spotted in music video for Usher’s “Rivals” featuring Future…

Watch the video on YouTube here… Usher – “Rivals” Featuring Future.

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AuraGELL-O™ Bifractive Diffuser Technology!

AuraGELL-O™

Biosynthesized Bifractive Polyamide with Diffusive Biomass Technology

Acoustics First® is hankering to announce the first products made with our newly developed AuraGELL-O™ Compound. First realized by Peter Cooper and patented in 1845, this Biosynthesized Bifractive Polyamide has a “sweetness” when combined with our Diffusive Biomass Technology. AuraGell-O™ is a Bio-Polyamide compound which exhibits Bifractive properties, doubling the potency of the Biomass Diffuser Technology by carving the wave in two, thereby creating a phase cancelling stream which functions as a frequency tuned absorber.

The AuraGELL-O™ Infra-Red dissolves low-frequencies, while AuraGELL-O™ In-LIME absorbs the mid-band frequencies (Acoustics First® is cooking up AuraGELL-O™ Ultra-Violet for high frequencies).

Available in AuraGELL-O™ Barrel and Pyramid formats, you get the benefits of classic diffuser styling with the added bonus of the AuraGELL-O™ Biosynthesized Bifractive Polyamide with Biomass Diffuser Technology.

Installation is a piece of cake – Just nail it to the wall!

Installation is a piece of cake – Just nail it to the wall!

By mixing the AuraGELL-O™ products with other traditional acoustic products, you get enhancements never before considered – extra diffusion and absorption with a fruity scent!

By mixing the AuraGELL-O™ products with other traditional acoustic products, you get enhancements never before considered – extra diffusion and absorption with a fruity scent!

“We loved our AuraGELL-O™ Barrels so much – we went back for seconds!” – Angelo LeMonjello

Call Acoustics First® and get your AuraGELL-O™ Barrels and Pyramids today – because by tomorrow, they will all be devoured!

Update: Due to an outbreak of AuraGELL-O™ weevils, and massive consumer demand, we regret to inform you that this was an April Fool’s joke.

Bon appétit!

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Good fences make good neighbors: Acoustic Guide for Commercial Building Tenants

Here at Acoustics First, we often receive inquiries from business owners who have moved into a commercial building shared with other tenants. Unsurprisingly, the most common acoustic issue is excessive sound transmission between neighboring businesses.

In commercial buildings with multiple tenants; such as outlet malls, office buildings and shopping centers, it is important to understand the nature of the neighboring businesses, especially ones directly next to, above or below an occupant.  The following are categories of adjacent tenants with distinct acoustic environments which can disrupt or be disrupted by neighboring businesses.

A loud dynamic neighbor.

Standard Adjacencies:  These neighbors tend to be have soft to moderate ambient noise levels that range from about 40-75 dBA, which generally remain constant throughout their operating hours. This often includes low-moderate levels of background music or chatter that has no significant amounts of low bass frequencies. Some examples of these spaces would be standard retail, electronics, clothing, or shoe stores, coffee shops, grocery stores, department stores, call centers, or an office with an open layout. The requirements for sound isolation associated with these types of adjacencies are less stringent, so standard construction practices are generally acceptable.

Dynamic Adjacencies: These neighbors come in two categories “loud” and “soft”. The neighbor that would be categorized as “loud” would have an average of ambient noise levels above 75 dBA for long periods of time throughout operating hours. This level of noise sustained over long time periods will conceivably disrupt other neighbors that share adjoining walls. Some examples of these spaces are pre-schools or daycares, kennels (doggy day cares), high-sound-intensity fitness studios (cycling, aerobics, Zumba, CrossFit, etc.), bars/restaurants with loud or live music, recording studios and live music venues.

The dynamic neighbor that would be categorized as “soft” would have average ambient noise levels below 40dBA during operating hours. With this type of noise level, there is less tolerance for excessive noise coming from adjacent spaces/tenants. It’s important to minimize the overspill of noise to these spaces to avoid disturbing them. Some examples of these types of spaces would be doctor or law offices, spas/massage therapy, yoga studios, upscale retail, fine dining restaurants, libraries and book stores.

Dynamic adjacencies will usually need specialized acoustic treatment and/or construction in order to control excess noise transmission. If you are surrounded by dynamic neighbors (both loud and soft) or would classify your business as dynamic, you may have to apply fundamental construction and extensive acoustic treatment to control noise transmission. That said, even after taking these precautions, the noise transmission may not be reduced to tolerable levels.  Some examples of these situations would be a high intensity fitness studio next to a yoga studio, a live music venue sharing a wall with an upscale restaurant, a Law Office above a Daycare or a recording studio under a book store. Avoid the hassle and expense of extensive construction by choosing your neighbors wisely!

So remember:  when you are considering commercial locations for your business it is quite possible that you may encounter a number of these issues.  It’s always best to design your space with the acoustic requirements of your neighbors in mind.

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Bonus Room to Project Studio! Nick Lane Mastering

Nick Lane, an independent audio engineer whose credits include Rascal Flatts and Reba McEntire, contacted Acoustics First® seeking help with his project studio. This process would convert the bonus room in his house (a second floor space above his garage) into a Project Studio.

Nick Lane Bonus Room - Before

After receiving some measurements and photos, we went to work designing a layout for the space.

Nick Lane Visualization 1 Nick Lane Visualization 2

Placement of panels and ceiling clouds were optimized to reduce early reflections and trap bass, and a combination of Model D’s and C’S were used to widen the “sweet spot” of his room.

Nick Lane - After

“Sounds really good!….. High end is sooo much less harsh…… walking around the room, the low-end doesn’t disappear in places anymore” – Nick Lane

Nick Lane Panorama

 

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StratiQuilt™ Before and After – Graveyard Carz!

AcousticsFirstFor our first post of 2017, we thought we’d share this video produced by our friends at Graveyard Carz! When the reality show had noise issues with their compressors while filming, they solved the problem by using Stratiquilt™ Acoustic Blankets from Acoustics First®. This video shows a before and after comparison and is a great example of the practical application of these industrial sound control blankets.

Enjoy!

StratiQuilt™ Before and After – Graveyard Carz! from Acoustics First®.

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