Archive for category DIY

Bonus Room to Project Studio! Nick Lane Mastering

Nick Lane, an independent audio engineer whose credits include Rascal Flatts and Reba McEntire, contacted Acoustics First® seeking help with his project studio. This process would convert the bonus room in his house (a second floor space above his garage) into a Project Studio.

Nick Lane Bonus Room - Before

After receiving some measurements and photos, we went to work designing a layout for the space.

Nick Lane Visualization 1 Nick Lane Visualization 2

Placement of panels and ceiling clouds were optimized to reduce early reflections and trap bass, and a combination of Model D’s and C’S were used to widen the “sweet spot” of his room.

Nick Lane - After

“Sounds really good!….. High end is sooo much less harsh…… walking around the room, the low-end doesn’t disappear in places anymore” – Nick Lane

Nick Lane Panorama

 

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StratiQuilt™ Before and After – Graveyard Carz!

AcousticsFirstFor our first post of 2017, we thought we’d share this video produced by our friends at Graveyard Carz! When the reality show had noise issues with their compressors while filming, they solved the problem by using Stratiquilt™ Acoustic Blankets from Acoustics First®. This video shows a before and after comparison and is a great example of the practical application of these industrial sound control blankets.

Enjoy!

StratiQuilt™ Before and After – Graveyard Carz! from Acoustics First®.

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DIY – Back Wall Diffuser Array/Bass Trap: Revisited

DIY - Diffuser Array/Bass Trap

DIY – Diffuser Array/Bass Trap

bass trap foam diffuser - sideThis month we thought we’d share a few Real-Life pictures of an idea we first introduced back in summer of 2013: The “Back Wall Diffuser Array/Bass Trap”.

Isolation Hanger

Isolation Hanger

This is the DIY project which incorporates our Art Diffusors®, Cutting Wedge® foam and a couple of isolation hangers into one large free-floating unit, which is acoustically decoupled from the wall.

This particular array was put together by a music producer/bass player for his home. As you can tell from the pics, the construction of this unit was executed beautifully and it’s very close to the original concept drawings.

It’s never too late to get started on your own DIY project.

Real World - DIY

Real World – DIY

Visit the Original DIY page to find out how to make your own. 

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DIY Wood Diffusion Panel – ArtDiffusor® Trim

DIY Wood Diffuser Panel - Using ArtDiffusor Trim

DIY Wood Diffuser Panel – Using ArtDiffusor Trim

Here at Acoustics First®, we are often asked about wood acoustic treatment for spaces ranging from recording studios and auditoriums to churches and home theaters. Although the acoustic properties of wood are comparable to other reflective materials like gypsum and thermoplastic, wood’s superior aesthetic makes it a desirable treatment (wood is often perceived to “sound better” simply because of its visual properties).

Two different profiles that work together!

Two different profiles that work together!

Our newest wood acoustic treatment, ArtDiffusor® Trim, is a versatile, high frequency quadratic diffuser that can help improve the clarity of speech and music. Both Profiles (Type A & B) offer diffusion in similar ranges and allow for customizable installations. The different profiles can be used individually or together to modify the aesthetics of a room, while achieving the desired acoustic performance. In fact, in recent tests of ArtDiffusor® Trim, alternating the A and B profiles resulted in the best diffusion. Some examples of different installations include:

  • Back wall Diffusion for a theater, listening or mixing studio.
  • Slatted Ceiling Absorber.
  • Installation over or behind stretch wall
  • Chair rail, door and window molding.

ArtDiffusor® Trim can come in lengths up to 8’ and is available in Maple (other woods can be quoted). Later in this article we’ll walk you through how to build your very own diffusion panel using 4’ lengths of ArtDiffusor® Trim.

Diffusion at a Glance

Where typical fiberglass and foam panels absorb sound by transferring sonic energy into kinetic and thermal energy, diffusers act to scatter the energy, creating ambiance and a sense of open space. The function of sound diffusers is not to remove energy from your room, but to redistribute it, accurately reinforcing the sound source by controlling standing waves and flutter echoes, while retaining the room’s “liveliness”.
As is the case with any sound absorbing panels and diffusers, the treatment needs to cover enough critical surface area to make a noticeable impact. Simply installing a single piece of ArtDiffusor® Trim will not significantly improve the acoustics of a room. One way to ensure enough improvement is by using ArtDiffusor® Trim to build a series of diffusion panels and installing them as you would sound absorbing panels.

Building a Diffusion Panel – A step by step guide

  1. Plan out your Panel: Find out how many ArtDiffusor® Trim boards you want in your panel assembly. Our diffusion panel was to occupy an alcove that was 29” wide and each board has a width of just over 3.75”, so we opted for 7, 4’ boards. Remember, alternate type A and B profiles for optimal diffusion.

    Plan your Layout.

    Plan your Layout.

  2. Install the lower support board: This is what the ArtDiffusor® Trim boards will “stand” on. It is best to install acoustic treatment above chair rail height (3’-4’), to ensure that it’s effective around ear height. Measure and use a level to mark where the support board will go, install drywall anchors for a sure hold into the drywall, then drill and screw the support board into place. Be sure to countersink the holes so the facing strip has a flat surface to rest against.

    Install the Lower Support.

    Install the Lower Support.

  3. trimwall-supports

    Install the upper support board: This time using the ArtDiffusor ® Trim boards as a guide, measure, level and mark the location of the upper support board. Again, using drywall anchors, mount the upper support board (don’t forget to countersink!).The picture shows both support boards installed.
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  4. Attach lower facing strip: Use facing strip that is approximately a ½” wider than the support board. Line up the facing strip next to the support board and mark your screw locations ensuring that they won’t run into the support board screws. Drill the holes and counter sink, lining up the boards so the ½” overlaps on the top, and screw into place.

    Lower facing strip installed.

    Lower facing strip installed.

  5. Partially attach upper facing strip: Same as the lower facing strip, but mount so the ½” overlap is on the bottom, and only screw one side in so it’s easier to slide in the ArtDiffusor ® Trim boards later.

    Partially attach top facing strip.

    Partially attach top facing strip.

  6. Slide in Art Trim: Slide in the ArtDiffusor® Trim behind the facing strip and use biscuits to fit the boards together. We decided to position the boards with an approximately 1/8” spacing.

    Slide in ArtDiffusor® Trim panels.

    Slide in ArtDiffusor® Trim panels.

  7. Finish attaching upper facing strip & admire your new DIY Diffusion Panel!

    Final DIY Diffusing Wall Panel with ArtDiffusor® Trim!

    Final DIY Diffusing Wall Panel with ArtDiffusor® Trim!

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Acoustic Treatment for your Home Theater or Listening Room

Any good theater or listening is acoustically treated to ensure the sound coming from the speakers is what arrives at the listener’s ears. Conditions common in small/medium rooms, such as flutter echo and comb filtering, degrade the clarity of music and speech. Here are some tricks to get a full and accurate sound out of your home theater or listening room. For those visually inclined individuals, the accompanying video shows how a critical listening space would ideally be treated.

Bass Traps – low-end control
Low frequency problems are common to almost any room, regardless of size.  The good news is that most of the time the solution is simple. By installing bass traps in the corners of the room you can prevent the excessive bass build-up. If bass frequencies are allowed to build in the corners, it causes the bass frequencies to become muddy and undefined. The more corners you cover with a good trap, the better bass response you get from the room.

Having bass traps in all corners is best. That said, if you only have budget for two, having bass traps in the front corners of the room should be the highest priority. Fabric wrapped absorbers look as good as they sound, and Geometrix™ by Acoustics First, fit the corners like a glove.

Broadband Absorption – tame the ring.
To control the flutter echo caused by reflective parallel walls, it’s vital that the first refection points are treated with broadband absorption (wall panels). More than likely, your TV and/or sound system is in a fixed position, and your listening position will be relatively fixed as well. This should make the early reflection surfaces easy to locate. Sound travels in all directions from the speaker, including behind it, so put absorbers behind it on the wall. Don’t forget the floors, ceiling, and the wall behind you – sound will bounce off those as well.

Hang broadband absorbers over all the early reflection points – left, right, front and back so they are centered at ear height.  Placement is the first key to getting this reflection free zone.  The second is the right choice of absorber. To match your fabric wrapped bass traps, the simple choice is get some more panels wrapped in fabric. The Sonora® line of broadband absorbing panels coordinate with the bass traps, and come in a plethora of sizes and mounting options to work in your space.

Diffusers – put life back into your space.
Diffusion will give us something we couldn’t attain through absorption – a sense of open space.  Even after treating with absorbers, there are still areas of the room where sound waves will sit, because your room is a fixed box with fixed speakers.  Diffusers scatter the energy, creating ambiance with residual energy. This simple step does not remove energy from your room, but redistributes it into a soundscape that can make you forget you are in a room at all. In order of priority, the rear walls, front wall and ceiling are the most important surfaces to install diffusers.

There are many ways to diffuse the sound and coordinate with your room, from the fabric covered HiPer™ Panel and Double Duty Diffusers™, to the striking line of Art Diffusors® like the Model C, which can be painted to match your décor.

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