Archive for category Worship Facilities

Church Acoustics: Past, Present, and Future Challenges (Article)

With all of the challenges of 2020, Technologies for Worship Magazine wanted to discuss the issue of acoustics in the current state of things.  They approached Acoustics First® for help.  While focusing on streaming, the article also covers other emerging issues and future challenges as we all move forward.

Sound Solutions installation at Midway Christian Church in Bluefield, WV

Streaming services from empty halls is an often overlooked situation. (Sonora® Panel installation at Midway Christian Church – Photo by Bo Vandall, Sound Solutions – Beckley, WV)

Technologies for Worship article below.
TFWM august 2020 Acoustics First articleLink to Acoustics First® Article
(TFWM site here)

To overcome your present and future acoustic challenges, contact Acoustics First® for help!

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Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock – Acoustic Update

When the Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock wanted to use their sanctuary for more varied community events, it became apparent that they needed to address the acoustics of the space to meet the demands of those functions.

Acoustician Cameron Girard ran reverb calculations and provided a comprehensive treatment proposal utilizing Sonora wall panels. Sonora panels are a great solution for worship and performance spaces, offering excellent broadband sound absorption in an attractive, customizable finish. In addition to controlling the specular wall-to-wall reflections (echoes) which degrade speech and music, the recommended treatment aimed to reduce excessive reverberation by approx. 50%, significantly improving intelligibility. Cameron’s clear panel layout facilitated a simple installation that was performed by handy volunteers from USGW’s congregation.

Sonora Panels tamed reflections from the back wall and lowered the overall intensity. This increased clarity while keeping the ambiance that the congregants enjoyed.  Acoustic changes that tame a space don’t need to destroy its acoustic character… they can be focused to manage some of the elements that produce unwanted artifacts.

back corner of hall

Sonora Panels help to tame the harsh reflections coming from the back wall, corner, and angled fascia.

The front of the room received some more Sonora Panels, but reinforcing surfaces from the ceiling were left reflective to allow any unamplified voices from the stage to carry into the audience.

unity front view

Notice how the Sonora panels are used to control the reflections on the back and sides of the stage, but the ceiling is left mostly reflective.

Now a full year removed from this project, How did it turn out?

”The sanctuary at the Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock turned out beautifully both visually and acoustically. The folks at USCW are very pleased and the old sanctuary now has new life with more activities and recognition from the community as a great new venue for many things both church and community based including concerts and stage productions.” – George Muligano USCW

Another Happy Client!

Reach out to Acoustics First for a treatment recommendation for your performance space or worship facility!

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Sonora® Panels welcome congregations back “home.”

Sonora® Panels on the back walls and balcony help to make the space sound more intimate.

As people begin to head back into their places of worship, the focus on acoustics has again come to the forefront. Many have been streaming services and listening to music in their homes, where they had short reverb times and good acoustic clarity. They are experiencing a stark contrast in the large reverberant churches to which they are returning. By adding acoustic absorption in a space, you can improve clarity and reduce reflections which can fatigue the listeners.

The Sonora® Panels above are helping to break up the reflections coming from the balcony face and the rear balcony wall, improving the clarity of the voices and the music within the space.  This helps to create an intimate and comfortable acoustic environment for those in attendance – and makes it feel more like home.

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Improving your room’s acoustic system.

When RPN magazine needed an article to teach readers how to improve their room acoustics, they turned to Acoustics First® to get the scoop.

 

Read the Article:

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Learn About
YOUR ROOM’S ACOUSTIC SYSTEM – and How to Improve It

Ever wonder why some rooms sound better than others? What components contribute to
perception of sound in a space? What knowledge do you need to solve the sound problems that
you have?

The System

When people read the heading “The System,” there will be a great number who assume I am
talking about the “sound system” in a room – the speakers, amplifiers, signal processors, and
other electronic components that generally produce sound in a space. This is only part of the
acoustic system that creates the soundscape we hear when we are exposed to sound in a space.

Yes, sound comes out of speakers, and they are important, but the source of sound isn’t what
gives us a perception of the space we are in – it’s the space itself!

The walls, ceiling, floors, seats, sculptures, drapes, artwork, construction, and even people in the
space are all contributing to how we perceive that sound source in any given acoustic
environment. I’m not saying that the speakers aren’t important – but they are just the source of
sound.

If you have a room with a 5-second reverb time, it doesn’t matter what type of speakers you
have, any sound they make is going to continue to be heard for five seconds – as is every sound
afterward.

What does this mean? Even if you have the best speakers in the world in that room, it will sound
terrible (unless you are listening to Gregorian Chants…then it will sound awesome.)

However, if someone is speaking at a normal rate of speed, it will be unintelligible after the first 2
or 3 words – as those words will continue to bounce around with the sound of the next 15
words…like listening to 15 people all saying different things at the same time.

Your room is an acoustic system – from the sound source, to the ears of the listeners – as well as
everything in, around, and even outside of that room.

The Acoustician

Have you ever watched an acoustical consultant begin the analysis of a new space? It’s
fascinating. You will undoubtedly see them walking around the room while making noises –
clapping their hands, snapping their fingers, whistling, even talking loudly, shouting, and singing.

It’s as if they are bats using different sounds to figure out the characteristics of the room they are
in. They are, in fact, analyzing the room’s acoustic system. Where does sound reflect? Are there
echoes or flutter? What is the character of the reverb? They look at the structure, materials,
corners, architectural elements, floors, carpets, walls, windows, doors, ceilings and more.

Note: They begin this analysis WITHOUT using the speakers.

Why? If the room is bad, your speakers will not fix it.

What are they doing? They are listening. That’s it. Nothing fancy here – just listening.
I will say that many acousticians have done this so many times, in so many different spaces, that
they have an idea of what the room is going to sound like, without even making a peep – just by
looking at it. What are they looking for? What are they listening to? What can you learn from this?

Time to Listen

Everyone has a room where they dislike the acoustics. Go in there. Clap your hands. What
happened? Clap again. Snap your fingers. Make some noise – but make sure to listen. Where is
the sound coming from? Turn around, clap again. Walk to another area…clap.

As you walk around, you will hear the sound change. Turn your head. Is the sound coming from
the corner, the ceiling, both? Angle your ears in between two corners. Maybe that’s where it’s
coming from. Is there a large open balcony or a curved wall? Ask yourself these questions as you
walk around and listen.

Are any of the surfaces hard? What about the floor? Is the sound lingering over your head up in
the ceiling? Is there a defined slap off the back wall when you clap your hands? Is there a ringing
noise? Does the echo wash over you and linger?
Sharpen your listening skills. Map the room with your ears.

What Are You Doing in the Room?

This is an important question. For most uses involving speaking and understanding speech, there
are some good general targets. For example, for most rooms over 100m3 (15’ cube), a 0.8 to 1.7
second reverb time is ideal for many different functions.

However, keep in mind, some spaces may have special reverb requirements. If you’re doing
Gregorian Chants, a three to five second reverb time is still great!

Now, How Do You Fix It?

Most rooms are going to benefit from reducing the acoustic energy in the space. Absorption is
the most direct and easy to understand method – add soft stuff.

This sounds overly simple, but the initial experiments on calculating absorption were done by
moving around seat cushions – simple, but effective.

Fabric-wrapped absorber panels are today’s high-tech equivalent to the seat cushions. Curtains,
blankets, carpets, and other soft materials will also help to reduce the acoustic energy of a space.

Treatments like diffusers help to reduce focused acoustic reflections by spreading the energy
around. When sound hits a surface that is not flat, it will cover the entire surface, bending
around the corners and curves, and then bounces off in different directions.

This reduces what we refer to as ‘specular’ reflections – or direct, mirror reflections – which are
responsible for slap echoes, ringing, and flutter.

However, some hard, reflective surfaces in the front of the room can be beneficial to help
reinforce acoustic sound sources, like speaking, singing, or acoustic instruments.

Treating corners with bass traps can help to reduce bass buildup, as well as corner reflections,
which can cause other clarity issues within the listening environment.

Don’t forget…look to the ceiling for rafters and other elements that cause sound to bounce
around and put some absorption up there.

 

 

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Happy Holidays 2018!

Here are a few pics from a job in New York which was installed a while back by one of our regular dealers.

Note how they used a nice mix of 2’x4’ and 4’x4’ Sonora® Panels to work around the geometry of the room! Spreading around a bunch of smaller panels, like 2’x4’s, can work great because of the flexibility it gives you with your layout and design options.

Anyhow, Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays from Acoustics First®!

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