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Improving your room’s acoustic system.

When RPN magazine needed an article to teach readers how to improve their room acoustics, they turned to Acoustics First® to get the scoop.

 

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YOUR ROOM’S ACOUSTIC SYSTEM – and How to Improve It

Ever wonder why some rooms sound better than others? What components contribute to
perception of sound in a space? What knowledge do you need to solve the sound problems that
you have?

The System

When people read the heading “The System,” there will be a great number who assume I am
talking about the “sound system” in a room – the speakers, amplifiers, signal processors, and
other electronic components that generally produce sound in a space. This is only part of the
acoustic system that creates the soundscape we hear when we are exposed to sound in a space.

Yes, sound comes out of speakers, and they are important, but the source of sound isn’t what
gives us a perception of the space we are in – it’s the space itself!

The walls, ceiling, floors, seats, sculptures, drapes, artwork, construction, and even people in the
space are all contributing to how we perceive that sound source in any given acoustic
environment. I’m not saying that the speakers aren’t important – but they are just the source of
sound.

If you have a room with a 5-second reverb time, it doesn’t matter what type of speakers you
have, any sound they make is going to continue to be heard for five seconds – as is every sound
afterward.

What does this mean? Even if you have the best speakers in the world in that room, it will sound
terrible (unless you are listening to Gregorian Chants…then it will sound awesome.)

However, if someone is speaking at a normal rate of speed, it will be unintelligible after the first 2
or 3 words – as those words will continue to bounce around with the sound of the next 15
words…like listening to 15 people all saying different things at the same time.

Your room is an acoustic system – from the sound source, to the ears of the listeners – as well as
everything in, around, and even outside of that room.

The Acoustician

Have you ever watched an acoustical consultant begin the analysis of a new space? It’s
fascinating. You will undoubtedly see them walking around the room while making noises –
clapping their hands, snapping their fingers, whistling, even talking loudly, shouting, and singing.

It’s as if they are bats using different sounds to figure out the characteristics of the room they are
in. They are, in fact, analyzing the room’s acoustic system. Where does sound reflect? Are there
echoes or flutter? What is the character of the reverb? They look at the structure, materials,
corners, architectural elements, floors, carpets, walls, windows, doors, ceilings and more.

Note: They begin this analysis WITHOUT using the speakers.

Why? If the room is bad, your speakers will not fix it.

What are they doing? They are listening. That’s it. Nothing fancy here – just listening.
I will say that many acousticians have done this so many times, in so many different spaces, that
they have an idea of what the room is going to sound like, without even making a peep – just by
looking at it. What are they looking for? What are they listening to? What can you learn from this?

Time to Listen

Everyone has a room where they dislike the acoustics. Go in there. Clap your hands. What
happened? Clap again. Snap your fingers. Make some noise – but make sure to listen. Where is
the sound coming from? Turn around, clap again. Walk to another area…clap.

As you walk around, you will hear the sound change. Turn your head. Is the sound coming from
the corner, the ceiling, both? Angle your ears in between two corners. Maybe that’s where it’s
coming from. Is there a large open balcony or a curved wall? Ask yourself these questions as you
walk around and listen.

Are any of the surfaces hard? What about the floor? Is the sound lingering over your head up in
the ceiling? Is there a defined slap off the back wall when you clap your hands? Is there a ringing
noise? Does the echo wash over you and linger?
Sharpen your listening skills. Map the room with your ears.

What Are You Doing in the Room?

This is an important question. For most uses involving speaking and understanding speech, there
are some good general targets. For example, for most rooms over 100m3 (15’ cube), a 0.8 to 1.7
second reverb time is ideal for many different functions.

However, keep in mind, some spaces may have special reverb requirements. If you’re doing
Gregorian Chants, a three to five second reverb time is still great!

Now, How Do You Fix It?

Most rooms are going to benefit from reducing the acoustic energy in the space. Absorption is
the most direct and easy to understand method – add soft stuff.

This sounds overly simple, but the initial experiments on calculating absorption were done by
moving around seat cushions – simple, but effective.

Fabric-wrapped absorber panels are today’s high-tech equivalent to the seat cushions. Curtains,
blankets, carpets, and other soft materials will also help to reduce the acoustic energy of a space.

Treatments like diffusers help to reduce focused acoustic reflections by spreading the energy
around. When sound hits a surface that is not flat, it will cover the entire surface, bending
around the corners and curves, and then bounces off in different directions.

This reduces what we refer to as ‘specular’ reflections – or direct, mirror reflections – which are
responsible for slap echoes, ringing, and flutter.

However, some hard, reflective surfaces in the front of the room can be beneficial to help
reinforce acoustic sound sources, like speaking, singing, or acoustic instruments.

Treating corners with bass traps can help to reduce bass buildup, as well as corner reflections,
which can cause other clarity issues within the listening environment.

Don’t forget…look to the ceiling for rafters and other elements that cause sound to bounce
around and put some absorption up there.

 

 

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Acoustics First® at ASA Victoria 2018

Fall is always a busy time of year here at Acoustics First®. Besides the AES, our folks have also been making the rounds with the ASTM and the ASA.  The ASA in Canada was particularly interesting, with much discussion about the use of computer modeling to predict the acoustic performance of sound diffusers. Our own Jim DeGrandis co-authored a paper with Dr. Hassan Azad and Ronald Sauro of NWAA Labs on using laboratory measurements to improve acoustic simulations.

The ASA also just released a promotional video for their meetings.

If you look closely, you can spot Jim 0:43 seconds into this short video from the ASA. Of course he’s instantly recognizable by his trademark hat!

Jim & Trademark Acoustics First® hat!

(Bonus: Dr. Azad shows up @ 2:09!)

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Acoustics First @ A’18 and AIA Continuing Education!

Health Safety and Welfare (HSW) credits are vital to architects in their continuing education and to safeguarding the public, which is why they are required by the AIA to maintain a license. While some states vary on their requirements, AIA Architect members are required to complete 18 Learning Units (LUs) from registered AIA/CES providers – 12 of those must be in the topic area of Health Safety and Welfare (HSW).

To assist our community of architects in this task, Acoustics First® has completed the requirements to administer the AIA/CES approved HSW course “Architectural Acoustics” – developed by the Technical Committee on Architectural Acoustics (TCAA) within the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) – http://www.tcaaasa.org.

Being active in the ASA and the AIA, Acoustics First® is proud to support the continuing education of AIA Architect members in the field of acoustics.

For more information, stop by the Acoustics First® Booth (#425), or the Region of Virginias Breakfast at the New York Hilton Midtown (7:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.) on Friday and speak with Jim DeGrandis. Alternately, you can request more information from info@acousticsfirst.com or call Acoustics First® toll free at (888) 765-2900.

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AES 2017 – Thanks from Acoustics First

Thanks to everyone who flooded our booth at the 2017 AES/NAB show last week at the Javits Convention Center in NY!  We enjoyed all the enthusiasm of the attendees, and all of the conversations about projects, products, and acoustics!

If you kept your AES Dailies, you may have seen Jim and the Art Diffusor® Model D on Page 4 of the 2nd edition.

Jim DeGrandis from Acoustics First as shown on Page 4 of the AES Daily – Day 2

Thanks again!

Enjoy the spinners!
(Note: Fidget Spinners are not an acoustic device… technically)

*spin* *spin* *spin* *spin* *spin*

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Acoustics First @ AES/NAB 2017 – New York

AES 2017 Booth

Be sure to stop and see Acoustics First® at the AES/NAB at the Javitz Center in New York, October 18-20, 2017!  We are booth number 553 – Next to the “Mix with the Masters” and the “Mixer – Lounge and Bar” area.

You can’t beat Autumn in New York! See you at the show!

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