Archive for category Recording Studio

ArtDiffusor® Model C and Model F – Similar, yet different.

Model C vs Model F

We often get asked about the functionality of the different diffusers, and one of the frequently asked questions is about the differences between the ArtDiffusor® Model C and ArtDiffusor® Model F.  We will cover some of similarities and differences in the design, functionality and use of these two devices.

Design.

The Model C and Model F use identical math to come up with their basic structure, they even have angled faces – the main difference between the two is that the Model F elements are ½ of the Model C’s height, length and width – and then it is duplicated 4 times in the same footprint…  The Model C is nominally 2’ x 2’ x 4” deep.  The Model F is four quadrants that are nominally 1’ x 1’ x 2” deep – like little scaled down Model C’s… This makes them visually similar and aesthetically compatible.  This low profile design makes the Model F more desirable for ceiling installs in spaces with very limited headroom – like basement studios that have low ceilings.

 

Performance

Due to the different size of the elements on the two devices, they have very different frequencies at which they are most effective.  The Model C is a mid-frequency diffuser by design… having larger elements and deeper wells than the Model F.  The Model F is primarily a high-frequency diffuser, due to the small elements and lower profile.  Both diffusers are tuned to different frequencies as their “primary range,” and while they do affect lower and higher frequencies than they are designed for – it is to a lesser degree, or the product of absorption.

What does this mean?

The Model C has a primary design range of 1KHz to 4KHz.  This is where it is primarily designed to work.  It can and does diffuse below 1KHz and over 4KHz – just to a lesser degree than its primary design range.

The Model F has a primary design range of 2KHz to 8KHz, and again, it does diffuse outside of that range, but to a lesser degree.

The angled caps of both the Model C and Model F help to extend their high frequency range by reflecting sound in different directions at higher frequencies – causing the sound to scatter spatially.  The different heights of the elements cause sound reflections to be offset “temporally,” or in time. The sound that hits the higher elements is reflected sooner than the sound that hits the lower elements – travelling further before it is reflected.   This time offset, changes the “Phase Coherency” of the reflection; the larger the difference in the heights, the greater the offset in time.

The size of the elements matters as well. The shorter wavelengths of high frequencies can diffract and scatter off of the smaller elements of the Model F more readily than low frequencies, which see the Model F as a slightly angled & mostly flat surface. However, the lower frequencies are more affected by the larger and deeper elements of the Model C.

How do these differences help define their use?

The Model C is a great all around diffuser – it covers a wide range of frequencies, throws a very predictable 2D diffusion pattern, and it is tuned to a very musical range.

The Model F is a great high-frequency diffuser.  It targets a few very specific, yet important issues.  High frequencies are responsible for some nasty problems in rooms.  Flutter echoes, ringing, comb filtering, and other artifacts are particularly noticeable in higher frequencies.  If your room is otherwise performing well acoustically, the Model F can help tackle that last hurdle to make a good room into a great room.

Model F and C

Many critical listening environments use both the Model C and Model F to tune the diffusion in their space.

 

While the white Aeolians® on the back wall are the visual focal-point on in Big3 Studio A, look closely at the ceiling and you will notice a large array of black Model C’s and Model F’s. These help to intermix the diffusion of different frequencies in the large control room.

Due to their aesthetic and functional compatibility, many rooms benefit from using both.  Model C’s addressing the bulk of the Mid-range diffusion, and the Model F smoothing out the top end.

I hope that this highlights the unique properties of both the ArtDiffusor® Model C & ArtDiffusor® Model F – and helps to demystify their function and use in your space.

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The QuadraPyramid™ – A Multi-Faceted Gem

With all the Diffusers on offer from Acoustics First® these days, this gem is sometimes overlooked: the QuadraPyramid™. Here’s an install pic of a few in the ceiling of a control room at the University of the Pacific!

University of the Pacific

There’s a reason why various pyramidal diffusers have been used for decades. They work, and they work well! The QuadraPyramid™ is our own take on this classic design, using four offset pyramids to create 16 angles of reflection on a single unit. Also, when mounted directly to a wall, these diffusers can double as a ‘mid-bass’ absorber, like in the project studio below.

Spence Burton’s Project Studio

 

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Aeolian™ Diffuser – Mash up

Here’s one of the first install pics of our new Aeolian™ Sound Diffusers, installed in a home project studio. Also note the Art Diffusor® Models F & C, in the ceiling and behind the speakers respectively. This is obviously a diffuser connoisseur’s room.

Below shows the room after the Sonora® products are installed.

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Bonus Room to Project Studio! Nick Lane Mastering

Nick Lane, an independent audio engineer whose credits include Rascal Flatts and Reba McEntire, contacted Acoustics First® seeking help with his project studio. This process would convert the bonus room in his house (a second floor space above his garage) into a Project Studio.

Nick Lane Bonus Room - Before

After receiving some measurements and photos, we went to work designing a layout for the space.

Nick Lane Visualization 1 Nick Lane Visualization 2

Placement of panels and ceiling clouds were optimized to reduce early reflections and trap bass, and a combination of Model D’s and C’S were used to widen the “sweet spot” of his room.

Nick Lane - After

“Sounds really good!….. High end is sooo much less harsh…… walking around the room, the low-end doesn’t disappear in places anymore” – Nick Lane

Nick Lane Panorama

 

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DIY – Back Wall Diffuser Array/Bass Trap: Revisited

DIY - Diffuser Array/Bass Trap

DIY – Diffuser Array/Bass Trap

bass trap foam diffuser - sideThis month we thought we’d share a few Real-Life pictures of an idea we first introduced back in summer of 2013: The “Back Wall Diffuser Array/Bass Trap”.

Isolation Hanger

Isolation Hanger

This is the DIY project which incorporates our Art Diffusors®, Cutting Wedge® foam and a couple of isolation hangers into one large free-floating unit, which is acoustically decoupled from the wall.

This particular array was put together by a music producer/bass player for his home. As you can tell from the pics, the construction of this unit was executed beautifully and it’s very close to the original concept drawings.

It’s never too late to get started on your own DIY project.

Real World - DIY

Real World – DIY

Visit the Original DIY page to find out how to make your own. 

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