Posts Tagged noise control

DIY: Back Wall Diffuser Array/Bass Trap

Getting more out of your back wall diffuser array with a simple hanging DIY array/bass trap.

One of the big “back wall” questions people have is “If I have a large diffuser array, how can I get the bass trapping I need?”  A great answer to this question is to turn the entire array into a hanging bass absorber.  If you are already planning on getting diffusion for your back wall, here is a great way to use that wall space for more than just diffusion.

Stuff you need:

bass trap foam diffuser -decon- front

Assembly instructionsbass trap foam diffuser - side

  • Screw the two IsoHangers to the plywood, using a fender washer on each screw. These should be about an inch in from each end -drill small pilot holes first. (These will be used to hang the panel, this side will be designated as the back from here on out.)
  • Use Construction adhesive to attach the Cutting Wedge® Foam to the back of the panel in a checkerboard pattern (each panel 90° rotated from adjacent)
  • Use Construction adhesive again to attach the 8 Diffusers to the front of the Plywood (Follow the installation instructions for adhesive placement)
  • Attach the Rings or Wire to the free end of the IsoHangers.

What you have created is a hanging panel that will diffuse mid-high frequencies and trap the lows.  The hanging mass absorbs low frequency energy by moving slightly when pushed by the energy of the Low frequency Waves.  The rear facing fiberglass also absorbs low frequencies by dampening the panel, but it also absorbs any of the waves that happen to get trapped behind the panel.

bass trap foam diffuser - rear

Hanging the Diffuser/Trap Assembly

  • Measure and attach the Closet Brackets to the Wall – Use appropriate anchors!  If you have standard or double wall construction without Resilient Channels, use the studs – The IsoHangers will keep vibrations from transmitting through the wall.
  • Hang the panel on the Closet Brackets using the rings/wire with the Diffusers facing you and that’s it!

bass trap foam diffuser - frontThis simple DIY project is provided as a way for our customers to learn better ways to use our products and get more value out of the products they buy.  For those customers who are planning on purchasing diffusers to make an array, or maybe already have an array and are looking to try a new configuration – this project may be what you’re looking for.

A little History…

If you embark on this little construction project, you will be constructing studio elements that have remained basically unchanged since at least the early 1970’s.  Hanging plywood wrapped in studio foam or fiberglass has been used “behind the curtains” of many of the top studios for effective bass control for over 40 years – just no one has ever seen it, as it has been hidden in walls; masked as a false wall of fabric stretched across wooden louvers!

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Acoustics First Corporation supplies acoustical panels and soundproofing materials to control sound and eliminate noise in commercial, residential, government, and institutional applications worldwide.  Products include the patented Art Diffusor®, sound absorbers, noise barriers, acoustical fabrics and accessories. Acoustics First® products are sold for O.E.M applications, direct, and through dealers.  For more information on acoustical materials and their application, please visit www.AcousticsFirst.com or call Toll Free 1-888-765-2900 (US & Canada).

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DIY: StratiQuilt™ Room Treatment

There are some situations where people are looking for a more temporary (yet still durable and effective) room treatment.  Maybe you have a garage, or a practice space, or a place where you are looking for a usable solution that isn’t a permanent installation.  Here is a great (not to mention tax deductible) treatment that can address many of the isolation and absorption issues of a space, while remaining durable (Washable), and easy to remove and reuse.

qfm-wallpanel

Stuff you need:

  • Enough StratiQuilt™ Double-Faced Barrier Blanket to cover all of the wall and ceiling surfaces of the room you need to treat.
  • 2”x4” lumber for the edges (Used to attach the barrier to the walls and maintaining an air gap.)
  • Short Lag bolts and Washers
  • Misc. hardware to attach 2”x4” lumber to walls.

Here’s what you do.

Attach the 2”x4” lumber to the walls with enough spacing to line up the grommets on two overlapped edges of the StratiQuilt™ blankets – if you have purchased the roll, the finished edges are 4 feet wide.  Leave enough room to overlap the edges and bolt the quilts to the 2”x4” lumber as shown in the diagram above.  Continue around the room, overlapping the edges of the StratiQuilt™ blankets to seal off the room.  The blankets can be left loose over doors to allow for entry and egress while maintaining a good acoustic seal.

stratiquilt room treatment

If desired, continue the process across the ceiling to “lock in” the room acoustics.  This treatment may be considered by some to be a little on the “dead” side (High Absorption); however, The benefits of the treatment far outweigh this issue, which can be compensated for by adding a few acoustically reflective surfaces to the room (Drum Kit, Amplifiers, Racks, Diffusers, etc.)

Why use this system?

Other than it being very simple to install, take down and move with minor modifications to the structure, it performs a few vital acoustic tasks – all with one product.  The StratiQuilt™ design is two layers of quilted acoustic fiberglass with a layer of BlockAid® barrier in the middle.  The BlockAid® help the soundproofing of the room by it’s STC of 29, which will add significant isolation to the room.  Mounting on the 2”x4” lumber is not just done for ease – adding the air gap behind the barrier increases both its STC and NRC allowing it to work as a limp mass barrier/absorber.  The material absorbs on both sides (being double-faced), forcing in-room reflections to be attenuated immensely through the many layers of material it must pass through.

And on a final note, this economical start-up solution has the benefit of not being a “Building Material” for tax purposes, allowing for its immediate deduction as an expense.

Record your garage band without sounding like you’re in a garage, Try StratiQuilt™.

This simple DIY project is provided as a way for our customers to learn better ways to use our products and get more value out of the products they buy.  If you are looking for more ways to use the products you have, look to Acoustics First for Ideas.  http://www.acousticsfirst.com

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Acoustics First Corporation supplies acoustical panels and soundproofing materials to control sound and eliminate noise in commercial, residential, government, and institutional applications worldwide.  Products include the patented Art Diffusor®, sound absorbers, noise barriers, acoustical fabrics and accessories. Acoustics First® products are sold for O.E.M applications, direct, and through dealers.  For more information on acoustical materials and their application, please visit www.AcousticsFirst.com or call Toll Free 1-888-765-2900 (US & Canada).

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DIY: How to quiet down that noisy equipment rack

rackDIY Project – Rack issues

 

Take a few seconds and DIY fix some of the common problems with using equipment racks!

Not too many people think about their equipment racks, but many of us use them.  Usually it’s something like what you see to the right – the great, sturdy, utilitarian box.  Unfortunately, there are a couple inherent problems with these:

  • Ringing – The metal resonates causing a ringing effect – may be masked by program material.
  • Reflections – many times your rack is near sound sources causing reflections off the hard surfaces.
  • Noise – Fans and other devices in the rack can make noises that are disruptive to recording.

Here are a few DIY fixes for these common problems.

  • Composite foam with adhesive backing is perfect for stopping the ringing of filler panels.
  • Use some Composite Foam to line your trays, drawers and shelves to keep items from rattling around inside the case.
  • Make a temporary cover for the front and back with BlockAid® sound barrier with minimal ventilation cut-outs to use during takes if rack-borne noise is problematic.

This simple DIY project is provided as a way for our customers to learn better ways to use our products and get more value out of the products they buy.  If you are looking for more ways to use the products you have, look to Acoustics First for Ideas.  http://www.acousticsfirst.com

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Acoustics First Corporation supplies acoustical panels and soundproofing materials to control sound and eliminate noise in commercial, residential, government, and institutional applications worldwide.  Products include the patented Art Diffusor®, sound absorbers, noise barriers, acoustical fabrics and accessories. Acoustics First® products are sold for O.E.M applications, direct, and through dealers.  For more information on acoustical materials and their application, please visit www.AcousticsFirst.com or call Toll Free 1-888-765-2900 (US & Canada).

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Acoustics First releases video on Vibration Isolation

Vibration IsolationAcoustics First has conjured up yet another video demonstration.  As the fourth in a series designed to help explain common acoustic principles, this video briefly reveals what is necessary to provide vibration isolation.

Vibration isolation can quickly prove to be obtuse and relatively difficult to understand. Common problems like footfall from upstairs neighbors, industrial noise from machinery and HVAC equipment or isolating speakers and scientific devices can require completely different approaches. Most often, an on site assessment should be completed by a qualified engineering professional to determine an appropriate acoustic solution. In many cases the solution will require a modification to the structure and implement more than a single strategy.

This simple vibration demonstration challenges to provide a basic understanding of how acoustical materials may be used to prevent the spread of mechanical noise and vibration through existing structures like walls, floors and ceilings.

In this acoustic demonstration, a surface mounted piezo transducer connected to an analog meter will register levels of sound vibrations transmitted to the table. A vibrating device placed directly on the surface will transmit sound vibrations and resonate loudly throughout the table. These vibrations will register on the analog meter. By inserting isolation materials between the device and the surface, the mechanical sound transmission is reduced and sound no longer registers on the meter.

VIBRATION ISOLATION DEMONSTRATION: Controlling Mechanical Sound Transmission

CLICK HERE FOR MORE ON: VIBRATION CONTROL PRODUCTS

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Acoustical Material Design and Uses Q&A

Below is a Q&A session about acoustical materials.

How would you describe the existing landscape relating to acoustical systems? Where is the greatest need/ the most demand?
-Acoustical systems are deployed throughout many market segments.  Demand truly depends upon the specific type of acoustical requirement.  Applications can range from improving sound in a residential home theater to solutions to abate jet airplane noise.  Many of these projects must be examined on a case by case basis.

Popular Products
Fabric wrapped panel: http://www.acousticsfirst.com/sonora-wall-panels.htm
Sound Barrier: http://www.acousticsfirst.com/blockaid-vinyl-sound-barrier.htm
Art Diffusors: http://www.acousticsfirst.com/diffuser-art-diffusor.htm

What are some major issues that come up or problems to be faced?
-Most problems center around improving speech intelligibility or keeping sound from disturbing others.
Improve Intelligibility with Absorbers: http://www.acousticsfirst.com/sound-absorbers.htm
Block Sound with Barriers and Isolation Poducts: http://www.acousticsfirst.com/barriers-vibration-isolation.htm

When developing different types of sound proofing/ sound dampening materials what have proved to be the most useful materials to form composites out of? Where do you usually procure these base materials?

-Many absorber products are manufactured from fluffy or porous materials such as acoustical foam and glass fiber.
Noise barriers are made from dense and heavy materials and isolation materials range from metal springs to neoprene rubber.

You can read more about the basic categories of products here:  http://www.acousticsfirst.com/acoustics-first-products-overview.htm

Which materials or composites combinations have proved to be the most successful?
-The success of the material can only be measured in comparison with the application in which the material is used.  Not all applications will require the absolute best composite material.  There are varying degrees of requirements and materials that should be specified by a professional who can evaluate the project requirements.  Acoustical consultants are often used to determine the appropriate material and amounts of material for the specific project.

What surprises have you encountered while developing acoustical systems?
-Sometimes that physical limitations of materials or structures to support the materials may change the design or specification of an acoustic material.  For example, when blocking sound, massive and dense materials should be used, however, you must be sure the structure will be able to support the additional weight.  A prototype design may have the best intentions of being a great acoustical material but may have limitations when manufacturing, shipping or installing.

How big is the market for aesthetically pleasing sound proofing/ dampening systems?
-These days most markets segments are looking for materials that are aesthetically pleasing while at the same time needing them to be economical.  Visual trends are constantly changing and consumers may choose to compromise the look of a material to match their project’s budget.

Do you see any future trends? Where do they align?
-Trends are always changing based on market demand whereas material design and availability change based on the availability of access to raw goods at a fair price.  One constant that could maintain is that as the population grows one can anticipate the need for noise and sound control materials will also increase.

Do you think there is a need or interest in easily movable/ modifiable/ adjustable sound proofing/ dampening?
-Many customers would like to have the ability to remove or move their acoustical materials.  Much of this depends on the type of acoustical problem and how the will be installed.

Do you think there is a need or interest in sound proofing/ dampening that is easily cleaned? In what market do you think these exist?
-Some commercial applications such as hospitals, food service, or industrial facilities need materials that can be wiped down.  This depends on the environment in which the materials will be used.

What are some markets that have unmet needs? What is the need?
-Any markets that have sound and noise problems.

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Acoustics First Corporation supplies acoustical panels and soundproofing materials to control sound and eliminate noise in commercial, residential, government, and institutional applications worldwide.  Products include the patented Art Diffusor®, sound absorbers, noise barriers, acoustical fabrics and accessories. Acoustics First® products are sold for O.E.M applications, direct, and through dealers.  For more information on acoustical materials and their application, please visit www.AcousticsFirst.com or call Toll Free 1-888-765-2900 (US & Canada).

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